#WalkerDocs: Chris Wallace grills Scott Walker to a light golden crisp on FOX News Sunday

Chris Wallace doesn’t grill Scott Walker to the extent that he could have. It’s just a light golden brown.

But we know it’s FOX News, not MSNBC. Wallace does go after Walker enough to make him squirm.

Further down the page you can find the full transcript for the Governors’ segment including a video snippet that is only about medicaid/Obamacare.

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WALLACE: Thousands of emails were released this week that indicate that you knew that public workers were working on county time in political campaigns, which is against the law.
WALKER: That’s absolutely not true, and if you look at the facts out there. This is old news. This is about a case that was closed last March. A Democratic district attorney in Milwaukee County spent multiple years looking at all this information. The 27,000+ pages of documents that were just released this week. Looked by a team led by a Democrat in Milwaukee County, and last year in March, he announced the end of that case. Plain and simple. It’s old news.What we have political operatives at the DNC and the DGA. They desperately want to switch the subject..

WALLACE: In one email that was released this week, your then chief of staff Thomas Nardelli, let’s put this up on the screen, writes campaign and county workers that you wanted to hold daily conference calls, “to review events of the day or of a previous or future day so we can better coordinate sound timely responses,” and in another e-mail county administrative director Cynthia Archer suggests that colleagues should use a private e-mail account. “I use this private account quite a bit to communicate with SKW,” that’s you, “and Nardelli, the former chief of staff.”
Question: if county workers were doing nothing wrong, why should they be using a private e-mail account?
WALKER: Well, but that’s exactly to my point. you had a Democratic district attorney spend almost three years looking at every single one of those communications, interviewing people, talking to people and closed the case.
WALLACE: Did you have your own private e-mail account?
WALKER: It’s one of those where I point out district attorney has reviewed every single one of these issues.
WALLACE: But sir, you’re not answering my question.
WALKER: No, because I’m not going to get into 27,000 different pieces of information.

Below is the full transcript along with the FULL video of the Governors’ segment:

WALLACE: We’ll talk with Governor Shumlin and Republican Scott Walker of Wisconsin, next.

WALLACE: The nation’s governors are back in town for their annual winter meeting. In the past, they have often celebrated bipartisan efforts in sharp contrast to the gridlock here in Washington, but this year the governors seem just as divided as our national leaders over ObamaCare, jobs and social issues. Joining us now, the Republican governor of Wisconsin, Scott Walker and Peter Shumlin of Vermont, chair of the Democratic Governors Association. Governors, welcome back to “Fox News Sunday.”

PETER SHUMLIN, CHAIR, DEMOCRATIC GOVERNORS ASSOCIATION: Thanks for having us on.

GOV. SCOTT WALKER, R-WIS.: Thank you.

WALLACE: Governor Shumlin, we ran a clip of you just before the break bashing your Republican colleagues for as you said alienating women, immigrants and gays and in a session that — with President Obama earlier this week he talked about the fact that Republican, your colleagues are pushing the same old top-down tired economic policies. Is this conference all about trying to win Democratic seats? You now trail 21 to 29.

SHUMLIN: No, it’s not, and I guess I disagree with you a little bit, Chris. I do think the nation’s governors work together in a bipartisan fashion to get things down because governors have to get things done. Having said that, we clearly are in an election year, and when we want to talk about politics we do. My view, is and I think the president agrees, that we have seen the Republican governors get elected in 2010 deploy failed economic policies that have not created jobs for the middle class who are struggling and refuse to raise minimum wages and refuse to lift the boats of working people and instead, have cut taxes for the top one percent, giving goodies to the very wealthiest and charge that to the middle class. Now while they have done that, they have been distracted by the same social agenda that has absorbed the Tea Party folks in Congress going after sonograms and women and making the most personal of health care decisions, going after, you know, gays and working Americans, teachers, and they paid for these tax cuts by slashing education, so we just don’t think that’s a prescription for job growth.

WALLACE: Governor Walker, all of you meet tomorrow at the White House with President Obama. If he tries to put Republicans on the defensive, how are you going to push back?

WALKER: Well, I think in this particular session, the initial point that Governor Shumlin mentioned I think I agree with. For example, we’re going to talk about the National Guard where I think there is a common agreement amongst all 50 governors that we shouldn’t go back to pre- 9/11 standards when it comes to the National Guard in any of our states or nationally so there are issues we agree on. I think we get together as all the nation’s governors both at the conference and in the White House. The one area where I would disagree with the governor is that when you look at the successful governors across America that are Republicans in states like mine where private sector job growth is the best from April through December of last year than it’s been since 1994, or place like Florida where Rick Scott brought the unemployment rate down five percent, Rick Snyder did about the same thing in Michigan. Look at Susana Martinez and Nikki Haley and other governors like that. They are focused on economic and fiscal issues just like I am and that’s why we’re doing well across the country.

Here’s video on JUST the Medicaid/Obamacare portion:

WALLACE: One big issue that all governors are dealing with and I suspect it’s going to come up over the next few days is ObamaCare, and reading about the two of you, you couldn’t be on more different tracks. Let me put it up on the screen. In Wisconsin Governor Walker, you rejected the federal money to expand Medicaid, and you deferred to a federal exchange to run ObamaCare, not a state exchange. On the other hand in Vermont, Governor Shumlin, you accepted money to expand Medicaid and are running your own exchange. Let’s discuss both of those. Governor Shumlin, Vermont’s exchange, I think it’s fair to say, has been a mess.

SHUMLIN: Well, no it hasn’t.

WALLACE: Let me just finish. I mean, there’ve been big problems with both small businesses and individuals trying to sign up, no?

SHUMLIN: No. Listen …

WALLACE: No?

SHUMLIN: There isn’t an exchange in the country that hasn’t had a challenge of the rollout. We acknowledge that, but Vermont happens to be the state that has signed up more people per capita for affordable health care than any other state in the nation, including the federal exchange, so, you know, you’ve got to keep all of this in context. But listen, here’s the point.

WALLACE: Aren’t small businesses still having a problem because the back end hasn’t been filled?

SHUMLIN: Small businesses can’t sign up on the exchange. Individuals have. We’ve gotten everybody in. But listen, here’s the point. We all acknowledge, including the president and governors, getting the exchanges up was tough, but here’s the challenge for I believe this issue for governors in this election. Let’s say it gets fixed. We’re fixing ours, they are fixing theirs and the federal exchange is working better. The problem for the Republican governors, in my view on this one is, listen, I have people come up to me every day and say, thank you, governor. I finally have health care I can afford. Now, governors get held to a different standard on health care than congressional folks. Our constituents are smart. They know we didn’t pass it, we didn’t vote for it. We didn’t create it. We have to implement it. Now what voters want is for their governors to get health care to folks who can’t afford it, to accept hundreds of millions of dollars of federal money to help support something that both business …

(CROSSTALK)

WALLACE: Let me bring in Governor Walker on exactly that subject. I’d like you to speak to ObamaCare and the exchanges and whether this is just a blip or something more serious and to Governor Shumlin’s point. You turned down $119 million in federal money to expand Medicaid. A lot of people would say, really?

WALKER: Well, in our case I don’t think the measure of success in government is how many people are dependent on the government. I want people to no longer be dependent, because we empower them to get good jobs, family supporting careers in the private sector. And that’s part of our philosophy. We did something unique. We didn’t not do what other states did but just not taking the Medicaid expansion. We didn’t take the challenges that come with the Medicaid expansion and putting our taxpayers as risk. Instead, we found a way to do something in the Wisconsin way, but we for the first time in our state’s history, even my predecessor, Democrat, had people on our waiting list living in poverty for health care. We cover everyone in poverty — who’s living in poverty under Medicaid, we cover everyone above it by transitioning them to the marketplace. We have 224,000 more people covered than we did before and yet we don’t put the taxpayers at risk. I think that’s a win — I think that’s what people are looking for out of Republicans or Democrats as leaders who find a unique way to reform things.

SHUMLIN: (INAUDIBLE) You know, what Governor Walker just said may be true, but he’s turning down in Wisconsin, as an example, $4.4 billion in federal money over the next decade that would help Wisconsinites get affordable health care. Now, I’m just saying in my state and other states around the country these Republican governors have, because they don’t like the president, because they want to make a political point, are hurting their constituencies.

(CROSSTALK)

WALLACE: Governor Walker, you’ve got 30 seconds to respond.

WALKER: Because I love the taxpayers, and I don’t want to put them at risk. Even before the Medicaid expansion I had $600 million more to Medicaid, almost 40 percent of that was to fill in the federal government reneging on commitments they’ve already made even before the Medicaid expansion. That commitment is not going to be there and taxpayers all across America will be on the hook. They are not going to be on the hook in Wisconsin.

WALLACE: Governor Walker, you are getting heat now for two local investigations in the state of Wisconsin. First, when you were at the Milwaukee County executive, there are allegations, and in fact people have been convicted, for working on county time to help you and the lieutenant governor get elected. Here is an anti-Walker ad that is running right now in Wisconsin. Take a look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The investigation is getting closer to Governor Walker.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: What did the president know and when did he first know it?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: What did Scott Walker know and when did he know it?

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WALLACE: Now, we should point out that they have brought charges against a number of people. They’ve brought absolutely no charges against you, but the reason this is hot again is because thousands of emails were released this week that indicate that you knew that public workers were working on county time in political campaigns, which is against the law.

WALKER: Right, and that’s just not — that’s absolutely not true, and if you look at the facts out there, this is old news. This is about a case that was closed last March. A Democratic district attorney in Milwaukee County spent multiple years looking at all this information. The 27,000-plus pages of documents that were just released have been looked by a team led by a Democrat in Milwaukee County and last year in March he announced the end of that case, plain and simple. It’s old news. We have our political operatives at the DNC and the DGA that desperately want to switch the subject from the fact that things like us taking a $3.6 billion budget deficit and turning it into a nearly billion dollar surplus. They don’t want to talk about the improvements in the economy. They don’t want to talk about the success of new head (ph) of the state. Instead, they desperately want to switch this subject on a subject that’s already been resolved as of last March.

WALLACE: Now, it may be old news, and I want to point out again that no charges were brought against you, but because of this dump of 25,000 documents it’s new news to a lot of the people in the state and it’s been big news in local papers in Wisconsin. In one email that was released this week your then chief of staff Thomas Nardelli, let’s put this up on the screen writes, “Campaign and county workers that you wanted to hold daily conference calls, quote, “to review events of the day or of a previous or future day so we can better coordinate sound timely responses,” and in another email county administrative director Cynthia Archer suggests that colleagues should use a private email account. “I use this private account quite a bit to communicate with SKW, that’s you, and Nardelli, the former chief of staff. Question, if county workers were doing nothing wrong, why should they be using a private email account?

WALKER: Well, but that’s exactly to my point. You had a Democratic district attorney spend almost three years looking at every single one of those communications, interviewing people, talking to people and closed the case last March.

WALLACE: Did you know there was a private email account?

WALKER: No, again, it’s one of those right point out — the district attorney has reviewed every single one of these issues.

WALLACE: You’re not answering my question.

WALKER: No, because I’m not going to get into 27,000 different pieces of information. The bottom line is a Democrat who led the district attorney’s office looked at all this, decided not to charge anything other than the individuals. You mentioned, people who had worked for county in the past, but don’t work for me today. I think that’s pretty straightforward. It’s one of those things where they just want to keep pushing this issue into the forefront because in the end the folks running against us can’t counter a positive message when it comes to the economy and creating budget surpluses.

WALLACE: But you are in an election this year, as you point out. And a lot of people talk about you possibly running for president in 2016. Should Republicans worry from all of this about you as a potential presidential candidate in 2016?

WALKER: No. I think we’ll weigh the issues out. I think voters are much more concerned about the problems you mentioned with state and federal exchanges across the country because that actually affects their health care. They are concerned about the economic decisions that are distracting from putting focus on helping private sector employers creating more jobs. Those are the things they should be worried about. Those are the things we replaced in Wisconsin where our state lost 133,000 jobs because of the poor policies in the past. Instead we’ve created over 100,000 jobs in our state, we turned a budget surplus — a budget deficit into a surplus. Those are the things voters are concerned about.

WALLACE: Governor Walker, Governor Shumlin, we want to thank you both for coming in today, and we’ll stay on top of all of these issues.

WALKER: Thank you.

SHUMLIN: Thank you, Chris.

WALLACE: And thank you both.

When we come back, don’t expect a budget compromise President Obama floated last year to show up in his new plan. The panel comes back to discuss his changing position on entitlement reform and be sure to tell us what you think on Facebook and share your favorite moments from today’s show with other “FNS” fans.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

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