A message from Jeff Smith: “We should expect better from politicians, journalists”

As we face our fiercely divided state, we need to consider Jeff Smith’s message.  Smith describes what he did to take care of the state’s business while giving respect for the other side. The model of bipartisan give and take Smith describes is what I believe we want and need from our leaders, and what could have saved the Walker administration from an incredible backlash that is building this summer. Continue reading

12 Angry Cheeseheads

This is a must-see: 12 angry cheeseheads quietly floating by Scott Walker on Lake Wissota as he pretends they are not there.

This was the “Wisconsin Workers’ Fishing Opener and Boat Parade”

And then, there’s this:

A note on the blog slow-down:

A couple of people have commented that I am doing less on the blog lately. [One seemed to think I must be seriously ill.] It’s OK. Wisconsin politics still disgusts and fascinates me and sometimes incites a fit of barely contained rage. But my son is back to living at home and I do feel it’s good to spend some time with him.

It’s all good. New stuff is just around the corner. Some of my efforts are being put into the blog revamp occurring at an undisclosed web location.  This may seem like a small thing, but this morning, I figured out how to embed Stephen Colbert videos.

*Squeee!!!*

Happiest of Mothers’ Days to all.

 

12 Angry Cheeseheads

This is a must-see: 12 angry cheeseheads quietly floating by Scott Walker on Lake Wissota as he pretends they are not there.

This was the “Wisconsin Workers’ Fishing Opener and Boat Parade” 

And then, there’s this:

A note on the blog slow-down:

A couple of people have commented that I am doing less on the blog lately. [One seemed to think I must be seriously ill.] It’s OK. Wisconsin politics still disgusts and fascinates me and sometimes incites a fit of barely contained rage. But my son is back to living at home and I do feel it’s good to spend some time with him.

It’s all good. New stuff is just around the corner. Some of my efforts are being put into the blog revamp occurring at an undisclosed web location.  This may seem like a small thing, but this morning, I figured out how to embed Stephen Colbert videos.

*Squeee!!!*

Happiest of Mothers’ Days to all.

What’s next? Wisconsin high-speed rail updates November 24

What next? Good question. Wisconsin had 7 pro-rail rallies Saturday and a Talgo vigil in Milwaukee last night. Meanwhile our Governor-Elect Walker has not budged. Here are 2 actions that take it local:

  1. Eau Claire City Council sent its own pro-rail message to Walker.
  2. Appleton public library is hosting a pro-train forum scheduled for December 2nd.

Plus these Wisconsin and Minnesota DOT “open houses” could easilyl turn into rallies for rail. Some of the linked dates take you to a Save the Train facebook events page:

November 29 in St. Paul, MN,

November 30 La Crosse

December 1 Eau Claire

December 2 Fond du Lac

December 6 in Rochester, MN

December 7 Madison

A case of the “shoulds”: Emily Mill shakes her finger at the factioned and  fractured Left. She says don’t boo at moderates who want to help and get your focus on.

Who will ride this train? People that already ride the Hiawatha from Chicago to Milwaukee, for one. That line has had an increase in ridership of 49 percent in the past 5 years.

Can you hear that whistle blow? Three radio rail conversations, here.  Robbie Webber was guest on the Monday November 21 edition of Pubic Affair plus, the chief organizer of the statewide rallies, Sierra Club’s Shahla Werner, is on that evening’s In Our Backyard. Both shows are archived with WORT-FM. And West Central Wisconsin Rail Coalition clued me in on a 1 hour WWIB broadcast held November 19th – directly linked at their blog.

Does this have legs? CNN Money says a Florida Democrat is “sponsoring a Holocaust Accountability and Corporate Responsibility Act that would prevent companies from bidding on high speed rail contracts if they participated in the Holocaust and haven’t resolved claims brought by victims and their families”. Which would include a couple of high speed rail companies.

And a sweet tweet: shevegasWisconsin Senator Petri flopped so hard on High Speed Rail he had to hurt something http://is.gd/hHLF0

Coverage of Wisconsin Save the Train rallies for high-speed rail: Madison, Milwaukee, Watertown, Eau Claire, Oshkosh, La Crosse

My collection of coverage of Saturday November 20th’s statewide rallies to Save the Train. My rally attendance numbers are from articles, tweets, and blog posts. Let me know if you find an article/blog post/video/photo album to add. These rallies were sponsored by Sierra Club.

MADISON: I’ve heard these numbers: 300, 500, and 1,000 “My brother is a cop in Madison He said there were 1000 people present.”

Madison Rally Image from @onewisconsinnow


Republican Bob Lien got some booing but got through to the crowd in Madison, WI “…he and his company, which won a tentative work bid with the train, are in support of the stimulus project. The train issue, he said, has been manipulated unfairly by both sides, and though he would support using the federal money for roads and bridges, because that can’t happen, he supports the train.”-Isthmus

Video report from ABC’s Channel 27 WKOW.com. Good, good coverage.

NBC 15 got Mark Pocan’s great job stirring up the crowd. Perish the thought that Illinois might get Wisconsin’s rail $!

Channel3000 site-Excellent article chock-a-block with quotes.

Good collection of images at Forward Lookout and on flickr.com.

Image from Badger Herald, a UW-Madison student newspaper

UW student paper, Badger Herald’s good article, and finally, here is the meager stub of an article pushed out of Wisconsin State Journal.

 

 

 

 

MILWAUKEE 200-300 rallied


Owly Images
Milwaukee Rally Image from @CreativeCooler

TMJ4 reported from Milwaukee live. Nice job Jay Olstad.

The Daily Reporter in Milwaukee has been knocking out a great collection of articles on this passenger rail project .

Paltry effort from Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel.  But there are 127 comments HERE.

LA CROSSE 50 -75 rallied

Here’s a fave picture from Robert Freedland’s scrapbook of La Crosse photos:

Good job, La Crosse WXOW19.

OSHKOSH 50-100 rallied

I’ve noticed a lot of TV stations don’t write much on their web sites – so when 1 does, I have to say “atta boy”. Channel 2 WBAY did excellent video + a good article. Executive Director of John Muir Chapter of Sierra Club Shahla Werner is quoted.

Northwestern.com’s article.

WATERTOWN: 100-125 rallied

Apparently I am the only person who blogged/wrote about Watertown? 125 people. Great crowd. Go HERE.

EAU CLAIRE: 100 rallied

Eau Claire’s main paper has a paywall now. Only a couple free paragraphs on their rally

100 folks shivered in Eau Claire at their rally-here- some images and words from Uppity Wisconsin. By the way-consider that this was 1) opening day of deer season, 2) a friggin cold place at 25 degrees & windy, and 3) in the 1st half of the Badger football game. Impressive.

6 rallies in Wisconsin for high speed rail [AKA intercity rail]

It’s a pretty amazing day. Six rallies in Wisconsin to support the Wisconsin passenger rail project that Scott Walker wants to reject. They are in Madison, Milwaukee, La Crosse, Watertown, Oshkosh, and Eau Claire and all at NOON. I’ll be going to Watertown, where there is/was a station for the planned route and Mayor Ron Krueger is speaking. More info is HERE on facebook or at the Sierra Club website.

Before I go – I’ll look at answering the anti-rail “choo choo” crowd’s jeers, I mean, “questions”.

Speed?: Illuminating radio personality Vicki McKenna said the service would go at “cow speed” in a recent tweet.  Facts: The train will operate at 79 mph initially when installed in 2013. By December 2015, speeds increase – 90‐110 mph between Milwaukee‐Watertown and 110 mph between Watertown‐Madison.

True “high speed” is about 150 mph. In a national master plan, a high speed rail runs Chicago to Minneapolis in the future –  building off of this line.

Too expensive to maintain? Scott Walker, Governor as of January 3rd, 2011, says that the train will be a wasteful “boondoggle” and too expensive to maintain.

I turn to James Rowen’s blog “The Political Environment” and a piece called “Did WISDOT analyse the costs and benefits of the Madison-Milwaukee Rail Line – and its termination?” He reminds us that 100% of the construction – or $810 million – comes from the federal stimulus plan. And, 90% of the yearly maintenance is covered by the federal gov’t as well. Leaving us with $750,000 to cover. This figure, I recall, is 0.03% of our yearly DOT budget.

On paying for that $750,000- Rowen says, it’s covered. And I agree: “The train was to produce more than 4,700 construction jobs through 2013 and create at least 55 full-time operator and other jobs just in this Wisconsin piece of a Midwestern network,  – – so my question is, did the state figure out what the projected state income tax payments would be on worker and contractor salaries, for example, and also the projected sales taxes on materials purchased for the line’s construction?”

If we build it, will they come?: You’ll see this comment from critics-“Nobody will ride the train” There’s statistical analysis done by DOT using the same models they use for any traffic that show 300,000 people will ride the train per year Milwaukee to Madison, and of course more when it goes to Minneapolis[Note-A commenter left a note that explains why 300,000 is a very conservative number]. But I know a lot of people can’t trust stats. Robbie Webber does a nice write up on that in her rail myth-busting piece. Just an excerpt:

I think the naysayers would be very surprised how many people commute between Madison and Milwaukee every day for work. Or somewhere in between like Watertown or Delafield. I can’t tell you how many people I’ve spoken to who either do this commute themselves, or work with someone that does the commute. Why do these people live so far away? Some are part of a couple where one person works in Milwaukee, and the other in Madison. Some changed jobs and don’t want to uproot the family. Some love living in the country, and a long commute is the price they pay. Some are at temporary positions and see no reason to move for a job that may be over in a year or so….The three things that will convince people to not drive (for certain trips) are: time, money, and a pleasant experience. For some people one of these is more important than others. Some people will do anything to save a few bucks, even if it means getting there slower or in a less convenient way. For other people, they don’t care how much it costs, as long as it is fast. Still others just hate fighting traffic, and will do almost anything to not have to drive at certain times or to certain places. .. Being able to get an hour’s work done instead of being stressed out is a big incentive for many people.

Can you turn that $ into road $? Scott Walker ran on the campaign promise that he would first kill the train, and 2nd, turn that $ into money for “crumbling roads and bridges”. In this DOT financial planning document, you will see read that the money is for intercity passenger rail only. Also, if deadlines are missed, the money goes to other eligible projects in a similar class. Ignoring this, Walker persisted, and DOT Secretary Ray LaHood reasserted that the money is for high speed rail. And other states wait in line for it eagerly. Governors in the states of California, New York, Illinois, Florida, and North Carolina have all communicated some or a lot of willingness to take that $810 million off of Wisconsin’s hands.

Lastly, a myth-buster article I have shared widely is Opponents spew myths about high-speed rail by Mike Schafer from BizTimes.com.

6 rallies in Wisconsin for high speed rail [AKA intercity rail]

It’s a pretty amazing day. Six rallies in Wisconsin to support the Wisconsin passenger rail project that Scott Walker wants to reject. They are in Madison, Milwaukee, La Crosse, Watertown, Oshkosh, and Eau Claire and all at NOON. I’ll be going to Watertown, where there is/was a station for the planned route and Mayor Ron Krueger is speaking. More info is HERE on facebook or at the Sierra Club website.

Before I go – I’ll look at answering the anti-rail “choo choo” crowd’s jeers, I mean, “questions”.

Speed?: Illuminating radio personality Vicki McKenna said the service would go at “cow speed” in a recent tweet.  Facts: The train will operate at 79 mph initially when installed in 2013. By December 2015, speeds increase – 90‐110 mph between Milwaukee‐Watertown and 110 mph between Watertown‐Madison.

True “high speed” is about 150 mph. In a national master plan, a high speed rail runs Chicago to Minneapolis in the future –  building off of this line.

Too expensive to maintain? Scott Walker, Governor as of January 3rd, 2011, says that the train will be a wasteful “boondoggle” and too expensive to maintain.

I turn to James Rowen’s blog “The Political Environment” and a piece called “Did WISDOT analyse the costs and benefits of the Madison-Milwaukee Rail Line – and its termination?” He reminds us that 100% of the construction – or $810 million – comes from the federal stimulus plan. And, 90% of the yearly maintenance is covered by the federal gov’t as well. Leaving us with $750,000 to cover. This figure, I recall, is 0.03% of our yearly DOT budget.

On paying for that $750,000- Rowen says, it’s covered. And I agree: “The train was to produce more than 4,700 construction jobs through 2013 and create at least 55 full-time operator and other jobs just in this Wisconsin piece of a Midwestern network,  – – so my question is, did the state figure out what the projected state income tax payments would be on worker and contractor salaries, for example, and also the projected sales taxes on materials purchased for the line’s construction?”

If we build it, will they come?: You’ll see this comment from critics-“Nobody will ride the train” There’s statistical analysis done by DOT using the same models they use for any traffic that show 300,000 people will ride the train per year Milwaukee to Madison, and of course more when it goes to Minneapolis[Note-A commenter left a note that explains why 300,000 is a very conservative number]. But I know a lot of people can’t trust stats. Robbie Webber does a nice write up on that in her rail myth-busting piece. Just an excerpt:

I think the naysayers would be very surprised how many people commute between Madison and Milwaukee every day for work. Or somewhere in between like Watertown or Delafield. I can’t tell you how many people I’ve spoken to who either do this commute themselves, or work with someone that does the commute. Why do these people live so far away? Some are part of a couple where one person works in Milwaukee, and the other in Madison. Some changed jobs and don’t want to uproot the family. Some love living in the country, and a long commute is the price they pay. Some are at temporary positions and see no reason to move for a job that may be over in a year or so….The three things that will convince people to not drive (for certain trips) are: time, money, and a pleasant experience. For some people one of these is more important than others. Some people will do anything to save a few bucks, even if it means getting there slower or in a less convenient way. For other people, they don’t care how much it costs, as long as it is fast. Still others just hate fighting traffic, and will do almost anything to not have to drive at certain times or to certain places. .. Being able to get an hour’s work done instead of being stressed out is a big incentive for many people.

Can you turn that $ into road $? Scott Walker ran on the campaign promise that he would first kill the train, and 2nd, turn that $ into money for “crumbling roads and bridges”. In this DOT financial planning document, you will see read that the money is for intercity passenger rail only. Also, if deadlines are missed, the money goes to other eligible projects in a similar class. Ignoring this, Walker persisted, and DOT Secretary Ray LaHood reasserted that the money is for high speed rail. And other states wait in line for it eagerly. Governors in the states of California, New York, Illinois, Florida, and North Carolina have all communicated some or a lot of willingness to take that $810 million off of Wisconsin’s hands.

Lastly, a myth-buster article I have shared widely is Opponents spew myths about high-speed rail by Mike Schafer from BizTimes.com.